laurashapiro: a woman sits at a kitchen table reading a book, cup of tea in hand. Table has a sliced apple and teapot. A cat looks on. (Default)
[personal profile] laurashapiro
The DSMV reviewed as if it were a dystopian novel.

Not only is this hilariously funny and beautifully written, like all good satire it has a critical, serious point at its soul.

The sufferers of DSM-5, meanwhile, have no voice; they’re only interrogated by a pitiless system of categorizations with no ability to speak back. As you read, you slowly grow aware that the book’s real object of fascination isn’t the various sicknesses described in its pages, but the sickness inherent in their arrangement.


Seriously, read this. It's amazing.

There's some ableism but I found it permissible in the broader context. I'm open to discussing it.

on 2013-10-21 09:36 pm (UTC)
yhlee: soulless (orb) (AtS soulless (credit: mango_icons on LJ))
Posted by [personal profile] yhlee
I love this premise and have bookmarked to read when I am, ah, sane. :-] (Right now I can't track long passages of text. It's embarrassing. To say nothing of the difficulties of operating a smartphone.)

on 2013-10-21 10:57 pm (UTC)
jae: (Default)
Posted by [personal profile] jae
Okay, wow, that's fabulous.

-J

on 2013-10-22 11:47 am (UTC)
kore: (Default)
Posted by [personal profile] kore
That is 100 lbs of awesome in a 5-lb bag.

on 2013-10-22 04:48 pm (UTC)
ellen_fremedon: overlapping pages from Beowulf manuscript, one with a large rubric, on a maroon ground (Default)
Posted by [personal profile] ellen_fremedon
That is brilliant.

on 2013-10-22 04:49 pm (UTC)
rydra_wong: Text: BAD BRAIN DAY. Picture: Azula, having one. (a:tla -- bad brain day)
Posted by [personal profile] rydra_wong
Even an outburst of happiness can be diagnosed as a manic episode.

... no it can't.

And the reason why things like "caffeine intoxication disorder" exist is so that there's a tickybox to fill in for the person who turns up at the ER bouncing off the walls with heart palpitations and overwhelming anxiety, but turns out to have just downed twenty espressos.

This is where my pedantry runs into my appreciation of humor sometimes.

I mean, the DSM exists so that the correct numbers can be filled in on forms for insurance companies (and, secondarily, so that research studies on people with particular illnesses can make sure they're studying roughly the same population -- as opposed to, say, the sixties, when more-or-less everything tended to get diagnosed as schizophrenia). So it's a mechanized tickybox list of criteria because ... that's what it's required to be.

I am all for arguing about the content and the usefulness (or not) of various constructions and changes in criteria. But bashing it for its form seems rather like bashing a phone directory or a dictionary for its form.

At no point is there any sense that madness might be socially informed, that the forms it takes might be a reflection of the influences and pressures of the world that surrounds us.

To be honest, this makes me reflexively twitchy. Actually, my severe depression is not "a reflection of the influences and pressures of the world that surrounds us". I realize it'd be so much more deep and literary if it was, but, you know, it's not, and lazy Laing-ianism (and Freudianism) has made my life significantly worse in various respects. The writer doesn't quite say that all mental illness must really be "socially informed", but ... I feel that's part of the subtext here.

ETA: Which is obviously more than somewhat "My issues, let me show you them". But it's a relevant POV here, I think.
Edited on 2013-10-22 04:51 pm (UTC)

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laurashapiro: a woman sits at a kitchen table reading a book, cup of tea in hand. Table has a sliced apple and teapot. A cat looks on. (Default)
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